That time Isaac Asimov predicted Facebook, Google, Wikipedia and YouTube

Originally posted on Fusion:

Isaac Asimov, the grandmaster of science fiction who coined the term “robotics,” was also a prolific columnist. His essays, always succinct and witty, appeared in many places: airline magazines, Newsweek, and even obscure trade publications such as SciQuest, the magazine of the American Chemical Society.

In one of these short articles, Asimov predicted Google, Wikipedia, Facebook and YouTube. The essay is called ‘Future Fantastic’ and was published in 1989 in a periodical called Special Reports Magazine. At the time, only hardcore hobbyists used modems and trawled BBS servers. Tim Berners-Lee had not yet invented the World Wide Web, and Mark Zuckerberg was not even in first grade.  No one today remembers Special Reports Magazine. But Asimov’s essay, which was later reproduced in his Robot Visions anthology, survives as a tour de force of technological extrapolation.

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‘Future Fantastic’ starts as an examination of the ‘fourth revolution’ in…

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Going Indi(e) with Tata

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I enormously enjoy simple and small things in life as much as big, banging, outrageous ones. Be it indie movies, video games, music or anything else. Here in the realm with cars and technology, the new Tata Gen X is no different. Life changing in big ways in the last few years and especially in the last few months, it was a delight surprise Indiblogger having a meetup/drive at Pune in association with Tata Motors, inviting 24 bloggers primarily from Mumbai and Pune, and few lucky winners flown down from across the country for this, serving as a quick getaway and a delightful experience during a otherwise busy events.

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With a =n early morning bus ride from Mumbai which reminded everyone of school/college picnics on-board, the best deal of the day was sealed with the location where we base-camped (sorry, cars), the Tata Motors Lake House which felt like an oasis in a desert.

Dancing is good for everybody.

Breakfast with this view. Good morning. #FollowTheGenX @indiblogger

A photo posted by The Nameless One (@aworas) on

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With letting that trying to sink in, after a hospitable welcome by the fine folks from Tata Motors, Indiblogger and various others; the conversation moved from breakfast and welcoming to the agenda of the day.

Moving on. Quite literally.

After some necessary formalities, aka “don’t get killed, don’t hurt anyone else, or destroy stuff” among other things, goodies which continue to spoil people even further, and people sorting themselves into groups with whom you’d go on the drive with, depending on which driver you want available, who one would want to hit on for the rest of the day, or people as crazy as you are, all proceeded to have a spin around Pune.

Team H, high and happy, who easily won the day.

Driving around the city in the blazing sunny weather was an incredible and relaxing experience, made possible by everyone who made the day happened, from the organizers and the good company of people, to random strangers on the road. Yes, it wasn’t just a drive where except the driver everyone lazily sits back, we were made to do incredibly stupid things challenges by tweets sent out from people across the country, in the pursuit of more prizes and virtual glory. I could write a book on it, so sticking to the piece you can catch all the action which happened en route through #FollowTheGenX, and of course on twitter and Instagram.

After a long day of driving, having loads of fun and great conversations, a quick lunch stop at a good place with another great ambiance (we take our surroundings seriously, not just the food) we return to the lake house in the evening for some additional test driving displaying the car’s easy usage and maneuvering capabilities…

… more food…

There’s a cupcake for everybody.

Spending the remainder of the eveni tngg talkino people, thanking the good folks from Tata for inviting us to this magnificent (no more) secretive place and Indioggbrle for making it happen.

There's an endless road to rediscover. #FollowTheGenX @indiblogger

A photo posted by The Nameless One (@aworas) on

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The ocean at the end of the lake. #FollowTheGenX @indiblogger

A photo posted by The Nameless One (@aworas) on

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And who ends a great day without some great music?

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NOTHING better than #Drumming in #Nature! #TaalInc #DrumCircle #ComeDrumBeOne #Rhythm #Roots #Peace #Vibration

A photo posted by Varun Venkit (@varunvenkit) on

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Varun (pictured above) and Janak from Taal Inc. ended our day with an epic drumming session, just what one like me needed. As we bid farewell until next time proceeding to get back to Bombay, needless to say it wasn’t just a good fun day but an experience in itself.

No dogs were injured during that day of amazing-ness nor while writing this post.

Only Love.

How can I be as great as Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, Richard Branson?

Answer by Justine Musk:

Extreme success results from an extreme personality and comes at the cost of many other things. Extreme success is different from what I suppose you could just consider 'success', so know that you don't have to be Richard or Elon to be affluent and accomplished and maintain a great lifestyle. Your odds of happiness are better that way. But if you're an extreme person, you have no choice but to be what you are, and happiness is more or less beside the point. These people tend to be freaks and misfits who were forced to experience the world in an unusually challenging way. They developed strategies to survive, and as they grow older they find ways to apply these strategies to other things, and create for themselves a distinct and powerful advantage. They don't think the way other people think. They see things from angles that unlock new ideas and insights. Other people consider them to be somewhat insane.

Be obsessed.

Be obsessed.

Be obsessed.

If you're not obsessed, then stop what you're doing and find whatever does obsess you. It helps to have an ego, but you must be in service to something bigger if you are to inspire the people you need to help you  (and make no mistake, you will need them). That 'something bigger' prevents you from going off into the ether when people flock round you and tell you how fabulous you are when you aren't and how great your stuff is when it isn't. Don't pursue something because you "want to be great". Pursue something because it fascinates you, because the pursuit itself engages and compels you. Extreme people combine brilliance and talent with an *insane* work ethic, so if the work itself doesn't drive you, you will burn out or fall by the wayside or your extreme competitors will crush you and make you cry.

Follow your obsessions until a problem starts to emerge, a big meaty challenging problem that impacts as many people as possible, that you feel hellbent to solve or die trying. It might take years to find that problem, because you have to explore different bodies of knowledge, collect the dots and then connect and complete them.

It helps to have superhuman energy and stamina. If you are not blessed with godlike genetics, then make it a point to get into the best shape possible. There will be jet lag, mental fatigue, bouts of hard partying, pointless meetings, major setbacks, family drama, people who bore and annoy you, little sleep, less sleep than that. Keep your body sharp to keep your mind sharp. It pays off.

Learn to handle a level of stress that would break most people.

Don't follow a pre-existing path, and don't look to imitate your role models. There is no "next step". Extreme success is not like other kinds of success; what has worked for someone else, probably won't work for you. They are individuals with bold points of view who exploit their very particular set of unique and particular strengths. They are unconventional, and one reason they become the entrepreneurs they become is because they can't or don't or won't fit into the structures and routines of corporate life. They are dyslexic, they are autistic, they have ADD, they are square pegs in round holes, they piss people off, get into arguments, rock the boat, laugh in the face of paperwork. But they transform weaknesses in ways that create added advantage — the strategies I mentioned earlier — and seek partnerships with people who excel in the areas where they have no talent whatsoever.

They do not fear failure — or they do, but they move ahead anyway. They will experience heroic, spectacular, humiliating, very public failure but then find a way to reframe until it isn't failure at all. When they fail in ways that other people won't, they learn things that other people never do. They have incredible grit and resilience.

They are unlikely to be reading stuff like this. They would rather read a biography of Alexander the Great or Catherine the Great or someone else they consider to be Great. They have an insatiable hunger for information and will plunge to the dark depths of their chosen subject (see that bit about obsession, above).

I could go on, it's a fascinating subject, but you get the idea. I wish you luck, strength, and a stiff drink when you need it.

How can I be as great as Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, Richard Branson?

Traveling Abroad First Time? 10 Questions on Your Mind.

Originally posted on The Shooting Star:

In retrospect, I consider myself incredibly lucky for the opportunity to study and live abroad at the age of 17. I grew up in a protective middle class family in the small bubble town of Dehradun. In search of my independence, I applied to and got accepted in a university abroad, and flew away with a big study loan and bigger dreams.

I remember being extremely nervous about traveling out of the country all by myself. There are too many myths circulated among Indian families, and after years of traveling, I hope to simplify it for you:

1) How to choose your first foreign destination? 

how to travel abroad, first time traveling abroad It’s a pretty amazing feeling to look at the world map and pick where to go. Photo by Riccardo Cambiassi

My advice: Don’t follow the crowds.

I’ve met many travelers who swarm to museums abroad just because everyone else does, even though they don’t particularly enjoy art or…

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but remembering is steam and engine

The Nameless One:

“The world is full of rooms
and no place to remain.”

Originally posted on live in the layers:

Hauntingly beautiful verse from Li-Young Lee (1957- ).

“Every Circle Wider”

Silver, the women sing of their bodies
and the men. Darker, the men sing
of their ancestors and the women.
Darkest is the children’s ambition
to sing every circle wider. Dying,

each sings at the edge of what he knows,
pregnant with the unknown, that chasm
sustained trembling (called singing) makes visible
by over-leaping

Criminal, my recalling that country’s songs
and never intending to go back. No word
comes from there, but remembering
is steam and engine, my voice
filling and emptying as I sing:

The world is full of people
and no one at all.

The world is full of horns,
and none of them are to be found.

The world is full of rooms
and no place to remain.

The world is full of light,
but no one’s seen a thing.

The world is all dark, yet a…

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